King Hancock Orthopaedic Journal 
 
 
 
King Hancock Orthopaedic Journal 
 

The King/Hancock Orthopaedic Journal is an annual publication of the research efforts and presentations of the orthopaedic surgery residents at Atlanta Medical Center.  The purpose of this journal is to present the ongoing work of these residents for educational purposes and communication with the orthopaedic community.

The King/Hancock Orthopaedic Journal was named for two of the historical cornerstones of the Georgia Baptist Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program.

Richard E. King, M. D. was the founder of the orthopaedic surgery residency program in 1964, and served as chairman until 1994. He was past President of the Atlanta and Georgia Orthopaedic Societies, Secretary and Vice-President of the American Orthopaedic Association, and President and Secretary of the Russell Hibbs Society. As a teacher, Dr. King shared his understanding of orthopaedics throughout the world in lectures, textbook, and manuscripts. In developing the journal, we honor his enthusiasm for acquiring knowledge as well as his willingness to share it. He was a prominent member of the orthopaedic community and served as co-editor of Fractures in Children. Dr. King died in 2010, but his legacy and commitment to orthopaedic eduation are deeply established at the Atlanta Medical Center.

Charles I. Hancock, M. D. carries the distinction of being one of the first residents of the Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program at Georgia Baptist Medical Center (now Atlanta Medical Center).  He further exemplified himself in serving fellow physicians and the residency program as Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedics, as Vice-President, President and Chief of the Medical Staff. Dr. Hancock has served as a physician for the Crippled Children’s Medical Service in Thomasville, Georgia and Atlanta on a continuing basis since he was a resident, and most recently served as Vice-President for Medical Affairs and Services at Georgia Baptist from 1992 until his retirement. For his commitment to orthopaedics and involvement in medical care, we remain deeply appreciative. Both of these gentlemen served the program with great distinction, and it is for them that the residents named their research publication.