Thinking about having a baby? 
 
 
 
 

The decision to have a baby can be the most wonderful decision you’ll ever make. It’s a time of excitement and perhaps apprehension. You want to make sure you’re as prepared for this new life as possible.

Today’s mother-to-be has many choices in how she gives birth. At Atlanta Medical Center, we work with you so that your baby’s birth will be the experience you want it to be. Our private rooms and family-centered environment allow for flexibility in birth choices such as the use of labor balls and tubs for relaxation during labor plus birthing pools for water births.

Whether you’re looking for a natural birth, traditional birth, Lamaze, waterbirth, vaginal birth after Caesarian, or Caesarian-section, we can help. Our trained staff includes physicians, nurses and midwives who help support families through one of the most exciting and wonderful adventure of their lives – the birth of a child.

We have developed the Birth Options at AMC program to help you with these choices.

For a physician or midwife referral, call 404-265-DOCS.

Preconception Planning

There are steps you can take even before you get pregnant that may help ensure a healthy baby. You’ll want to start with scheduling a preconception appointment with your doctor. This visit will give your doctor an overview of your current health status plus your medical and family history.

Your doctor will want to know is whether you’re immune to certain infections such as rubella. If you aren’t immune, your doctor may recommend that you get the rubella vaccine at least three months before you become pregnant. During the fall, you should talk to your doctor about a flu shot.

Your current health status including conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma and lupus, will play a part in your pregnancy. You and your doctor should take steps to make sure these conditions are under control before you become pregnant.

You and your partner will also need to discuss any inherited conditions such as sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. Genetic counseling may be recommended for certain ethnic groups and others with inherited disorders in their family history.

Lifestyle Changes

There are changes you can make to your lifestyle before you become pregnant to make certain you are as healthy as possible. Some of the changes to consider are:

  • Stop smoking. Smoking decreases a woman’s chance of getting pregnant, and may reduce a man’s sperm count. Smoking during pregnancy may result in a lower birth weight for the baby. Women who smoke have a higher incidence of miscarriages and stillbirths.

  • Reduce or eliminate alcohol consumption. Babies who are exposed to alcohol before birth may have mental retardation, learning disabilities and behavioral problems. Like smoking, alcohol consumption may reduce your ability to conceive and may affect both the quality and quantity of a man’s sperm.

  • Eat Healthy and Exercise. Adopting healthy eating habits and exercising can help you get in shape for your pregnancy. If you are overweight, your doctor may want you to lose weight before you become pregnant. Women who are thinking about getting pregnant should start taking folic acid supplements that help protect the baby against neural tube defects such as spina bifida. Talk to your doctor about how much folic acid you should be taking.

To learn more, plan to attend our “Maybe Baby?” seminar.

For a physician or midwife referral, call 404-265-DOCS.

 
 
 
 
 
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